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Rose of Sharon (Hibiscus syriacus)

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Summary

Native to Asia and introduced in North America, where it has historically been widely grown as a gardening plant.

Range - Expand

LegendColor
Introduced
Introduced or Not Present

This tentative map is based on our own research. It may have limited data on Canada and/or Mexico, and there is some subjectivity in our assignment of plants as introduced vs. expanded. Read more in this blog post.

Habitat

In North America, common and often abundant in suburban gardens and partly-shaded weedy patches and semi-wild areas near landscaping. Found on drier ground than any of the native Hibiscus species, which are wetland plants.

Uses

Widely planted as a landscaping plant, where it is valued for its showy flowers, ease of growing, and ability to be easily pruned into different growth habits, including use as a hedge, or alternatively, a single-trunk growth habit.

Numerous Hibiscus species, both native and introduced, are found in North America. Of these, H. trionum is the only introduced species with a wide range, and has a much wider distribution. The native H. moscheutos and H. laevis also have wide distributions in the southeast, but are limited to wetlands.

Hibiscus syriacus (Rose of Sharon) | USDA PLANTS Database (About This Site)

Hibiscus syriacus | Go Botany (About This Site)

Common Hibiscus | iNaturalist (About This Site)

Hibiscus syriacus (Rose of Sharon) | Missouri Botanical Garden Plant Finder (About This Site)

Rose-of-Sharon | Virginia Tech Dendrology Factsheets (About This Site)

Hibiscus syriacus | Biota of North America Project (BONAP) (About This Site)

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