Home » Compare Plants

Northern Red Oak vs Shumard Oak

This guide is under construction and has not been published yet. It may have errors. When in doubt, double-check other sources for definitive ID.

These two red oaks are frequently confused where they overlap, mostly in the south-central U.S. and parts of the midwest and southeast. Both have large leaves and acorns. Although some trees are easy to tell apart, some are very similar in appearance.

Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra)

Shumard Oak (Quercus shumardii)

A large tree and one of the major components of the forests of eastern North America, the northern red oak has a wider range than its name may suggest, extending quite far into the "deep south", but also covering a large portion of the northeastern U.S. and into Canada.
A large red oak native to calcium-rich bottomlands in the southeastern to central US.
Leaves more oval-shaped, with widest point closer to the middle of the leaf.
Photo © Aaron Boers, CC BY 4.0.
Leaves more wedge-shaped, with widest point closer to the tip.
Photo © Nate Martineau, CC BY 4.0.

References & External Resources

These short lists show only links helpful for ID. For a complete list of references and resources also covering other aspects of ecology, visit the links section of the full article on each plant, which is the first entry here.

Northern Red Oak (Quercus rubra)

Shumard Oak (Quercus shumardii)

Quercus rubra | Go Botany (About This Site)

No corresponding entry

Quercus rubra (Northern Red Oak) | Illinois Wildflowers (About This Site)

No corresponding entry

Northern Red Oak | Virginia Tech Dendrology Factsheets (About This Site)

Shumard Oak | Virginia Tech Dendrology Factsheets (About This Site)

Quercus rubra | Flora of North America (About This Site)

Quercus shumardii | Flora of North America (About This Site)

Quercus rubra | Biota of North America Project (BONAP) (About This Site)

Quercus shumardii | Biota of North America Project (BONAP) (About This Site)